grass is always greener, so then you make slime!

So yes, I know we have it pretty good.  People tell me that.  People tell our kids that.  People tell my husband that.  We know it’s great to live on a farm.  There is no doubting it.

Until.

Mid summer hits and the kids are looking for “other” things to do.  Read, ‘non-farm related’ people.  They’ve planted and picked.  They’ve explored the fields and tended to the animals. They’ve entertained themselves for quite some time with all the “farm stuff” and they’ve enjoyed themselves immensely.  Our family vacation to the north is still a couple of weeks away and now they’re wondering what else they can do.

Oh sure, they have loads of toys, books to read, friends to play with and they still have all their regular farm chores:  tending to their garden, feeding/watering the rabbit, quail and pheasants, walking the dog and helping out wherever else we might need them.  But what else?  Well, left with a good deal of  free time, these boys’ imaginations soar with other things that might be better than living on and tending to the farm that we have.

Quotes from our farm boys:   “Wouldn’t it be cool to live in the woods?” (Their grandfather has a cabin in the woods) ”Why can’t we have a creek on our farm?” (Aunt Donna has a creek by her house that the boys frequent) “Why can’t we finish our basement complete with a home theater, jacuzzi and a popcorn maker?” (Um, I don’t know anyone who has this but maybe the kids do) ”I wish we had a giant camper and could travel the world!” (Ryder checks them  out at the garage near Maggie’s Italian Ice)  “Let’s make homemade ice cream and sell it at the market!”  (The word ‘let’s' undoubtedly excludes them and means that they think their father and I should find another 40 hours a week somehow to make ice cream on top of everything else that has to be done) ”How about building a pool?” (Their Aunt Sha Sha, who lives just down the road, has one so don’t let them fool you into thinking they’re at all deprived of swimming this summer!)  The list goes on and on…:)  And although they’re really not complaining, it does get tiring hearing of all their wants.  I wonder if kids who live at the beach (my dream) get sick of it and wish they lived on a farm.  Probably.  Maybe.  I’m sure there are times.

But it’s okay, I know they love it here and it’s healthy to dream.  Maybe someday they or we will have/do these things.  I’m keeping my fingers crossed on the ice cream and big camper dreams.

The grass is always greener on the other side.  I ask the boys if they know what that means.

Insert much eye rolling from my kids right about now.  Okay.  I smile.  It’s time to make slime.

“What?”  Eye rolling has turned into eyes widened.  Ah, I’ve got something and it doesn’t require moving, major construction, building permits, change of occupation, lots of time or buckets of money.  In fact, it doesn’t involve anything more than a few ingredients and I guarantee a good time whether you live on a farm, at the beach, in the woods, in a camper or by a creek.  And it, the slime, need not be green as my youngest thought when considering my quote of grass being greener and then the suggestion of making slime.   I guess the connection is a long shot, but hey at least it got him thinking.

Nothing lifts a mood more in my house than the creation of something new, especially if it’s messy!  So here is my favorite boredom buster recipe.  After we make it and the boys have had ample time to squish it and make gross sounds with it, they like to use it with their army guys and rubber bugs.  We usually make it green or brown to give it that extra disgusting touch, but I believe that later today when we make another batch, that I will try making mine pink and adding some glitter to it!  That way I can be sure none of the boys in my house will touch it :)

SLIME RECIPE (NON-EDIBLE):  3/4 C. warm water, 1 C. Elmer’s glue, food coloring.  Mix together in one bowl.  In another bowl mix 4 tsp. Borax (this stuff is in the laundry section and it works awesome for so many other things too; you’ll love it!) and 1 1/3 C. warm water.  Pour contents of 1st bowl into the 2nd bowl.  DO NOT STIR.  Let set for 1 minute.  Remove from bowl and set on coated paper plate or bowl or waxed paper.  Do not put on cloth.  Store in air tight container.  Can add water during playtime for more slimy consistency.  This is a great activity for parties or as party favors in cool containers…even for the kids who seem to have it all :)

Make a container of it in every color imaginable while the weather is warm and play with it outside because it does stick to clothing, furniture, carpet and the cat.  Trust me on this!

Have a happy day

 

 

 

 

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6 Responses to grass is always greener, so then you make slime!

  1. Mike Opteris says:

    “…because it does stick to clothing, furniture, carpet and the cat. Trust me on this!” This made me laugh! Poor kitty. (I know that’s where you were going.) Thanks for the early morning chuckle.

    • Amy says:

      Hee hee! Yes, we often learn by experience, don’t we? Fortunately, he’s (the cat) no worse for the wear and he now stays away from the kids when they are playing with slime! Thanks for the comment; have a terrific day :)

  2. Mrs. Young says:

    I love this recipe!!! I used to make it all the time when I taught Kindergarten. I called it “flubber.” Have you ever tried drawing on it and then stretching the picture you drew… So many fun ideas! BTW I love your idea of pink with glitter… Makes me want to make my own batch! ;)

    • Amy says:

      Hi Mrs. Young! I know, isn’t it such a fun thing to make?! Ryder smiled his Ryder smile when I read about the pink with glitter and said, “That’s Mrs. Young for ya!” :)

  3. Allyssa Boyer says:

    This sounds really cool! I’m going to try it with my young cousins.

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